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20121101
20121130
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insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predicts that if the a as affected by sandy lose a quarter of their output for just two days, it would knock out $25 billion off u.s. economic growth in the fourth quarter. that could be as much a 0.6%. but longer-term, some of the financial losses should be recovered by repair and rebuilding eorts. home improvement stores like home depot and lowes wngl likely get a boost in sales. many construction jobs will be created to rebuild homes and businesses. and governments will be spending huge amounts of money to repesr subways, roads, and bridges sor allf those efforts should help boost economic activity early next year.e erika miller, "n.b.r. new york. >> susie: joining us now for a closer look at sandy's economic impact, mark zandi, chiefb. economist at moody's analytics. you know, mark, people often hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be rue i
ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new rsey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trainsrs >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn under the east river werepen. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don'think it's really normal for anyone right now.'t we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. r:eporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still with t power with temperatures dropping into the 30s.th >> we have hot soup, hot chocolate, blank hes, cleaning supplies >> reporter: some 1.4 miion homes and busisses acrossss seven states still were in the dark. well more than 700,000 of those were in new jersey where governor chris christie visited with victims and volunteers today. >> there's still 760,00 people, households without po
york city, new jersey, and long island are up and running. for those who do get gas, they'll pay more for it. gasoline prices in the northeast have increased as much as 14 cents a gallon. >> tom: 1.3 million people are still without power tonight, one week after superstorm sandy. and as susie mentioned, temperatures are plummeting, as anothestorm approaches the northeast. having no power and no heat is one concern. but thousands of peaple have also been left homeless by the storm, and that is fueling worries about a housing shortage. erika mieer reports.a >> repter: the new york city metropolitan area is slowlyep recovering after superstorm sandy. but many homes and businesses still don't have power, or heat. >> things that took months or years touild are gone, howui quickly we can get it back i'm not sure, but there will certainly be places that don't have por for a very long time.fo >> reporter: lack of power is more than just an inconvenience, it's also safety issue. temperatures have started hitting the low 30's, and a nor'easter is forecast later this week. so staying in unheated
to a number of rooftop rescues ol.trappedes residents yesterday in staten island. late today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg said most bridges and tunnels will be restricted to high-occupancy vehicles for next several days. but he said his city is on the road to recovery. >> bottom line is we've lost some people and pray for families. go forward here and keep this city going and make sure we have visitors and jobs for people. do that in the names we lost. thank you very much. >> reporter: in new jersey, aerial views from helicopters revealed scenes of total devastation. entire neighborhoods underwater in ocean county, an amusement park along the jersey shore in seaside heights in disarray, with some rides washed away by the waves.se those displaced by the storm have been taking shelter in gymnasiums and other facilities. >> we never went trough anything like this. we may have had a storm where it blew a couple of things back and forth, but for it to be flooded lace,all over the disheveled. >> i'm 69 years old and it's worse i've ever seen in my life. >> halloween will be on monday in
incredible support from volunteers. to the north, in hoboken, across from new york city, emergency dnd national guard trucks mo through the flooded streets overnight. when "sandy" hit, the storm surge on the hudson river swamped a quarter of the city, leaving 20,000 people stranded in their homes and in the dark. >> it's really scary. we don't have that much food. we prepared a little bit. >> reporter: for others across new jersey, the loss of electricity meant no way to pump gas, which led to long lines at places where fuel was available. > an hour and 40 minutes almost. crazy. i'm out of gas though, i have less than a quarter ta, so i had to get out today. >> brown: and financial help wa >> there's nothing more precious to people than their homes. homes are where their families are, memories and possesons of their lives and there's also a sense of safety to home. you feel like when you get in that place and you conse that door that there's a senseh of safety there. that sense of safety was violated on monday. with water rushing into people's homes at an enormous rate of speed and peo
of gas. we are on top of the gas situation. >> suarez: frustration was also at a boil on new york city'st staten island, where local officials complained they've been largely ignored since storm.'s >> this is america, not a third world nation. we need food, we need clothing. >> suarez: another fight was brewing over running the new york city marathon sunday morning beginning on staten island. new york city mayor michael bloomberg defended the decision. >> it doesn't use resources that can really make a difference in recovery and that sort of thing. it's a different group of people. we have to work around the clock for people to get through this thing, and i assure you we're doing that. if i thought it took any resources away from that we would, we would not do this. >> bloomberg reversed course and announced the marathon was canceled. further adding to the frustration of many, the power was still off for well over three million customers, many of them in new york and new jersey. this man lives in far rockaway, in queens. >> we are not sitting around here singing "kumbaya." this is real
hurricane sandy battered the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could al bring wind gusts of 65 miles an hour-- bedeviling efforts to restore power to more than 600,000 customers still
. >> tom: still ahead, the new york city marathon is cancelled. what it means for advertisers of this world class event. that encouraging employment report didn't do much for stocks on wall street. stocks oped higher, but sellers took over.d the dow closed down 139 points, the nasdaq lost almost 38 points, the s&p closed off 13. for the week, the dow fell 0.1%. the nasdaq was down 0.2%. the s&p gained 0.2% this week. we'll talk more about the marts a little later in the program with our friday market monitor guest.ts he's duncan richardson at eaton vance. an update on the aftermath of hurricane sandy now. with temperatures dropping, tempers are flaring in some areas struggling with no per and dwindling food and clean water. >> this is staten island. four days after hurricane sandy brought her destructive winds ng storm surge of atlantic seawater. across the hudson river from new york, some new jersey neighborhoods remain inundated with flood waters. low temperatures this weekend are forecast to be close toas freezing. the official count from the artment of energy had 3.6en million customers
since "sandy" hit. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg ordered gas rationing into effect. the gunman in last year's arizona shooting rampage was sentenced today to life in prison without parole. jared lee loughner killed six people and wounded 13, including congresswoman gabrielle giffords. she later resigned to focus on her recovery. several victims, including giffords, were in federal court today in tucson. her husband, astronaut mark kelly, told loughner, "you may have put a bullet through her head, but you haven't put a dent in her spirit." afterward, the u.s. attorney for arizona spoke to reporters. >> it is our hope that the final resolution of this case will be a positive step towards their healing process, physically, emotionally, and psychologically. it was with them in mind that we entered into this plea agreement with the defendant. >> sreenivasan: loughner pleaded guilty, thereby avoiding the death penalty. a warplane from iran fired on an american drone over the persian gulf last week, but the drone escaped unharmed. a pentagon spokesman confirmed the inciden
's flagship store in new york city. it's also investing in technology to beef up it's online presence. "n.b.r.'s" ruben ramirez caught up with macy's c.e.o. terry lundgren in new york this morning and began by asking him how sales are going. both in store and on-line. >> they're both growing and that's the good news for us and while the online business has been spectacular for macy's for several years, we really look at the consumer as an omnichannel consumer. so she comes in, she does her research on her phone. she decides what store she wants to shop. what items she wants to shop for. maybe going back to her desk and pulling the trigger there. so i think that's what happening today. so the line between online and physical stores is blurred. >> reporter: the past several years consumers have opened their wallets around the holidays but come january it seemed that that optimism faded. what are you expecting come january 2013? >> we've had 11 consecutive quarters of consistent growth of sales and earnings at macy's inc. we've found the formula. a lot of retailers depend on january to be a
. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey andew york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have re ad atme all of the airports in the new york area.at public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by including more companies in its survey. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the economic
for me is that if the upper end of sea level rise projections for new york city come to pass by late this century, we should expect to see sandy-level floods every 15 years or so. >> sreenivasan: ben strauss of climate central studies how rising seas affect coastal areas around the united states. he and other scientists project seas to rise another two feet by 2100. while sandy was staggering, sea-level rise made it even worse. >> we know today that the global sea level is eight inches higher from global warming than it was in the late 19th century. we know that the storm surge from sandy started eight inches higher than it would have started without global warming. >> reporter: new york decided to study the problem in 2008 when it created a task force to address climate change. but sandy has escalated the discussion about how new york can cope with rising water. from finding ways to live with flooding to holding back storm surge to retreating from coastal areas altogether. this man is a oashianing on rafer at the stevens institute of technology. he said the region needs to focus fir
jersey still were in the dark. new york city mayor michael bloomberg warned again the process of restoration and recovery will be slow. . a lot of residents unfortunately will be out of power for a long time. but rather than complain about it or even write about it, we're trying to do something about it. we can sit around and bring or hands and say it's terrible. mother nature brought us this storm. now we're just going to deal with it. we're going to go methodically street by street building by building and help people get going. we're going to do the most important life-threatening things first. and then we'll come back. we're not going to stop until everybody is back. >> holman: there also were more signs of progress today, as gasoline rationing ended in central and northern new jersey. rationing continues in new york city. wall street slid again today, amid concerns about impending spending cuts and tax increases in washington. the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 59 points to close at 12,756. the nasdaq fell 20 points to close below 2884. those are some of the day
new york city school principal. >> i'm always looking up to see whether the parents are engaged, and very often, i see them with an ear kind of tilted towards what i'm reading. i think sometimes-- parents may not know how to engage their children in reading. so my hope is-- how i present a book to a child, a parent would be able to emulate that and do the same for them when they're at home. >> reporter: the reach out and read program can be found in 5,000 medical centers across the country. it touches almost four million mostly low income children, at a cost of $10 per child, per year. bellevue's program is one of the largest. >> so here it tells you the skills that he should be developing and how you can help develop those skills by playing with him. >> reporter: program director, claudia aristy often talks with families while they wait. >> one of the ideas that i share with her is that she can be reading a book aloud to her 11 month-old while he's walking in the room, just putting language out there for him. we want to just bombard those brains with a lot of words. so we tell
-- there's no way we can live here-- in the house at this timel now. >> back in new york city, mayor bloomberg warned even mild flooding from the approaching storm could pro greater dangers than normal. >> places that didn't before have a problem with two and a half to four and a half-feet surge might very well this time. >> meanwerle, shortages of gasoline continue. although, officials said they were graduallyle easing. >> woodruff: that was was of harry srveensan. the we have the latest sign of a recovery. the increase was the largest since july 2006. and election day found wall reetnia smood tore buy. >> in iraq, 33 people died in a suicide car bombing north of baghdad. nearly 60 others were wounded. the attacker blew up his vehicle near an iraqi military base. most of the victims were iraqiir soldiers. there was no immediate claim of responsibility. and the classical composer and pulitzer prize winner elliot carterdied on monday at his home in new york city. carter was knownte for his rhythmically complicated works using american and european modernist traditions. the string quar
obama saw first-hand some of the worst damage in new york city today. he toured through several hard- hit areas and met with residents in line for aid at an emergency center. the president said federal help will be available to people for as long as it's needed. >> there's going to be some long term rebuilding required. you look at this block and you know that this is a community that is deeply rooted. most of the folks i met here have been here 20,30, 50 years. they don't want to see their community uprooted but there's got to be a plan for rebuilding. and that plan is going to have to be coordinated and it's going to need resources. >> suarez: another one of the neighborhoods that was on the president's radar today was in new york city, and it faces a long road back. it's also a place where volunteers are playing an increasingly important role in assisting residents. as we learned with the help of producer jonathan silvers in new york. >> reporter: a new citizens group has risen from the ruins of hurricane sandy on the streets of brooklyn, queens and long island. it's called occupy
this city back stronger and than ever before. >> new york city, no electricity, no lights, millions in the dark, fires, subways flooded, ruined rampant, many deaths. >>people work in the insubway system, in the construction industry in this state ve said they've never seen damage like this, so it's a new reality for us, and i think it's one that we're going to have to deal with. >> besides new york, new jersey was a victim of the disaster. governor chris christie .reviewd the situation at the shoreline, president obama at his side. >> we are here for you, and we will not forget. we will follow up to ma sure that you get all the help you need until you've rebuilt. >> later, at a news conference, the governor gave his report. >> the president of the united states and i have had six conversations since sunday. that shows a level of caring and ofconcern and interest that i think a leader should be giving to th ty of situation. so today, in fact, reed asked me this after i got off, after you know, i said good-bye to him after air afforce one, this wass comfortable and relaxing interactio
be so much easier. so we're looking at like payment. >> reporter: in new york city, sabrina norrie and kelli space have an idea of their own, called zero bound. if students are struggling to pay debt in dollars, why not pay it through community service? they're still raising money, but once it's up and running, the company will help borrowers get donations in exchange for volunteer work. >> i thought, there's got to be a way we can get creative about this. and being involved in volunteer work, i thought, lets see if we can invest that education of students and alumni back into the community through volunteering. >> reporter: innovations like these have the support of the federal government, in a report last month, the consumer financial protection bureau said if they work, private businesses could play an important role in helping student borrowers pay down their debts. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: for many people the holidays are typically a time to make charitable contributions. americans gave $200 billion to non-profits last year, and half of that came from the w
: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke came to new york city today to send a tough message back to washington-- get your act together. he urged lawmakers and the white house to reach a quick deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. >> uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the f
to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any time you get a problem in the gulf, it's really going to hinder oil prices. >> reporter: if the recent cease-fire between hamas and israel in the gaza strip holds, many think prices at the pump will dr
this is going to be our wake-up call and right now in new york city, the debate is over how much to increase fares in public transit and they -- the metrotransity authority wants to increase the price of riding a subway and the price of riding trains quite a bit, and so how does this make sense? we're supposedly having a wake-up call and we're making it harder for people to use public transit and that's because we don't have the resources that we need. >> you've been out on the devastation, why? >> i'm writing a book and the documentary to go with it and we were filming in the rockaways in staten island and in red hook, and also in the relief hubs where you just see a tremendous number of volunteers organized by occupy wall street. they call it occupy sandy. >> really? >> what i found is that the generosity is tremendous. i saw a friend last night and i asked her whether she'd been involved in the hurricane relief. they have my car, i hope they get it back. if you see it, tell me. people are tremendous. so one of the things that you find out in a disaster is you really do need a public secto
turn to our ongoing coverage of the recovery after superstorm sandy. new york city officials say they will demolish about 200 homes in the outer boroughs, including some heavily damaged ones in the rockaways. some 200 other homes in the city were so badly damaged by the storm that they likely will be demolished as well. as residents consider their next steps, they face questions over whether to rebuild and the role of insurance coverage. our economics correspondent, paul solman, visited the area as part of his reporting on making sense of financial news. >> solman: on new york's rockaway peninsula, workers clearing out robert kaskel's ground floor condo, the former manhattanite's little piece of paradise-- until sandy hit. >> the ocean came right into all the properties here. it blew open my front door right off the frame. the water rushed down into my basement, completely filling the entire basement, and then continued to rise. and i'm sure that there was even wave action inside because where the water line is, i see traces of water even higher than that. >> solman: flood insura
to prevent damage from the next major storm. the state, along with new york city, will ask for federal disaster aid based on the damage tally. one of the legendary bands of rock 'n' roll is marking its golden anniversary. the rolling stones celebrated 50 years last night in london, with the first of five shows in the united kingdom and the u.s. nina nannar of independent television news filed this report. >> two and a half hours, 23 songs, and 50 years. . ♪ i said hey, hey, you, you. ♪ get off of my cloud. ♪ hey, hey, you, you, get of my cloud. ♪ hey, hey, you, you, get off of my cloud ♪ >> thankfully for the rolling stones glowing reviews on this, their opening night of their anniversary tour. ♪ i want to be your lover, baby i want to be your man ♪ >> reporter: the men have a combined age of 273 years. but last night, they were clearly enjoying their trip down memory lane. even jagger's joke about the controversial ticket prices "how you doing in the cheap seats?" he asked, did not spoil the mood of the fans who came from all over the world. >> i came all the way from au
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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